Aniela Perry Cello Lessons

Aniela Perry Cello Lessons

5.0
1 employee
19 years in business

About this pro

I have been teaching in the greater Los Angeles area for over 16 years. Many of my students started with me at a young age and have gone on to study music in college. I also have a few loyal adult students who find cello lessons to be relaxing, fun and theraputic. 

Some students want to do their very best in their school orchestras, others want to perform in competitions and some just want to play for fun. I make the effort to understand the student's goals and tailor their personal curriculum to achieve those goals.

I am currently an active performer and studio musician and I hold a Masters of Fine Arts in cello performance and composition from the California Institute of the Arts.

I am located in Westwood.

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Los Angeles, CA 90025
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FAQs


What is your typical process for working with a new student?

In the first lesson I talk to the student (or their guardian) about their goals and any previous experience. Get to know the cello; how to hold the instrument, the names of the different parts and basic care. We will spend most of the lesson actually playing the instrument. I will suggest repertoire (books, recordings) to purchase or download.


What education and/or training do you have that relates to your work?

I have a MFA in cello performance and composition. I have been teaching privately for 16 years.


Do you have a standard pricing system for your lessons? If so, please share the details here.

In my home:

$45 per 30m

$60 per 45m

$70 per hour

Traveling to the student's home varies depending on time and location. I recommend having the lessons at my home, especially for young and beginning students, as being in their own home tends to be distracting.


How did you get started teaching?

 During my undergraduate studies I held a teaching assistanceship in music theory and ear training. My first teaching job outside of college was at McCabe's Guitar Shop in Santa Monica, in 2000.


What types of students have you worked with?

I have worked with a wide variety of students, from very young beginners to the elderly, from casual players to advanced students preparing for music school auditions.


What advice would you give a student looking to hire a teacher in your area of expertise?

Find someone you enjoy working with but will also push you a little, even if you are just doing it for fun. Music becomes more and more rewarding, the more time you put into it.

If you are an adult beginner, don't be discouraged. I have a student who is very accomplished in her field who once said to a colleague who also began cello lessons with me, "It's good for you to be bad at something"  This made me laugh but she had a great point. Many adults have a hard time starting a new instrument because of our critical minds. We are used to where we have gotten in life and it can be hard to be reminded of what it is like to simply not know something. The process can feel daunting but after a few years and a little hard work, it is really something special to be able to come home and play a little music.

For parents looking for a teacher for their child it is important to find someone the student is comfortable around and someone you feel safe leaving them with. When students are very young (under 6 or 7, or if they have special needs) I like the parent or guardian to be in the room. Otherwise I prefer that the lessons be just the student and I, as many children can be very distracted by the presence of their family members.


What questions should students think through before talking to teachers about their needs?

What is expected of me when I go home to practice? How long should I practice? How will I know what should I focus my practice time on?


Lessons offered