Illustration Tutoring

Illustration Tutoring

5.0
1 employee
17 years in business

About this pro

I pride myself on my passion for art. I've been illustrating seriously for nine years, and informally much longer than that.

I'm of the opinion that art is what you make of it -- there's no right or wrong way to do art. I want to help you understand that illustration belongs to you, and it should never be corrupted by overfocusing on technique. However, technique should still be studied -- one must know the rules in order to break them. I strive to strike the balance between hard work and passion.

I love creating things that have meaning to people. If someone looks at a piece of mine and feels anything, even disgust or dissatisfaction, I've done my job.

I also love helping people create things they're proud of. It always makes my heart soar when a friend of mine completes a piece with my advice, or a student accepts my critique and makes changes she likes. It feels almost magical to share that kind of pride with someone.

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Credentials

Herndon, VA 20170
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FAQs


What is your typical process for working with a new student?

We'll spend a lesson or so discussing goals and what kinds of things we should be focusing on. Once we've outlined what our goals are, we can start working. I'll recommend supplies, and we can begin with simple shape sketching. As we move forward, we'll refine those shapes into subjects.


How did you get started teaching?

In truth, I've never taught art in a professional setting before. I've given informal lessons though, and I've loved doing so since I was a child. I am also a writing tutor at my school's writing center, and I've learned a lot about how to give critique in a constructive way.


What advice would you give a student looking to hire a teacher in your area of expertise?

Your priority should be finding someone passionate! Art is all about passion, and if you find someone too bogged-down on the technicalities, you run the risk of creating flat art. Your pieces should and will reflect pieces of yourself; don't let yourself get trapped into creating "perfect" illustrations. Art is yours. No one can take that from you.


What questions should students think through before talking to teachers about their needs?

How much time are you willing to dedicate to practicing and sketching, rather than creating full pieces? What kind of message do you want to send with your art? Who are the artists that influence you, and what inspires you to create?


Lessons offered