Burlington, VT 13 Guitar Instructors near you

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Burlington Guitar Lessons

Gevry Music

Gevry Music

5.0 2 Reviews
Most teachers teach at a lesson facility which requires the student to travel. I teach customized music lessons at the student's house for convenience and comfort. I create a lot of my own materials which makes the learning process ultra focused. I teach students what they NEED to learn along with what they WANT to learn all while trying to keep a good balance. Enjoyment is the main focus along side learning!   
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Robert Caballero Guitar Lessons

Robert Caballero Guitar Lessons

My teaching approach: I specialize in students of all ages and use an adaptive teaching style to carefully tailor lessons based on need, desires and current skill level of each student in a positive and encouraging environment. I began studying guitar over 18 years ago. In 2000 I enrolled at Berklee College of Music and graduated in the spring of 2003 with a degree in Professional Music. In the fall of the same year I relocated to Hollywood, CA. I played in numerous bands around Southern CA and recently, in the Burlington area, so I bring a unique insight for those seeking to become professional musicians. My influences are: Eric Clapton, ... View Profile
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Advance Music Center

Advance Music Center

Description about my music education organization's philosophy, experience, community, curriculum, and faculty: Advance Music has been offering lessons for over 10 years. We have several teachers who are available 7 day a week here at Advance Music. it is our goal to make learning music as fun as possible. Everyone should be able to enjoy playing music. Guitar Techniques: Guidance In Equipment Selection, Song Writing, Scales and Exercises, Music Theory, Jamming Skills, Reading Music, Performance, Open tuning, Vocal Accompaniment, Rhythm guitar, Lead guitar ... View Profile
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John Gates Guitar And Ukulele Lessons

John Gates Guitar And Ukulele Lessons

I teach guitar, theory, and ear training for all levels. I also give lessons on beginner and intermediate ukulele.  My specialties are helping with learning your favorite songs, rock/pop/folk practical music theory, chord, scale and arpeggio knowledge, improvisation - rock, blues, jazz, ear training, songwriting and arranging, and advanced theory.It always excites me to see my students progress in their own unique way. Whether you are a total beginner or an advanced guitarist, I always seek to tailor fit lessons based on your interests. I find that theory and technique are most easily taught with the he ... View Profile
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Easy And Fun Guitar Lessons

Easy And Fun Guitar Lessons

Learn to Play or Sing your Favorite Songs, by Sight, by Sound.After years of touring Toronto and surrounding areas, Adam Jessen, guitar instructor is now living in Burlington, VT and available for teaching his craft to those that would like to learn the enjoyment of Live Performance. All Ages WelcomeSummer SpecialThree ½ hour lessons for $109.99That's $36.66 a lesson
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Bass & Electric Guitar Lessons By David Storie

Bass & Electric Guitar Lessons By David Storie

I offer electric and bass guitar lessons for the beginner or intermediate player. If you have a son/daughter, or just wanting to learn yourself, or even improve on your playing, please contact me! I have been teaching for 6 years. I can teach you all of the basics and everything you need to know to start out. Or, if you're already learning but are wanting lessons to advance your playing, then I offer that as well. I will drive to you. Feel free to contact me if interested. Thanks for taking your time to read me profile! Hope to hear from you. ... View Profile
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Gary Young Professional Guitar Lessons

Gary Young Professional Guitar Lessons

I've been teaching for over 14 years and customize lesson plans to help individual students achieve their goals.I make the lessons fun as well as educational.Learn your favorite songs, music theory, proper technique, sight reading, improvisation, song writing, and the tricks of your favorite guitar players!Styles include: Blues, Jazz, Rock, Metal, Bluegrass, Folk, Classical...Please contact me for more info. ... View Profile
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Best Guitar And Bass Lessons

Best Guitar And Bass Lessons

My motto is music can change everything if you let it into your life. I give lessons with a passion so everyone can enjoy the incredible world of music. Each student is taught specifically to his or hers interest and goals in a comfortable and affordable setting.I have a Bachelor's in Music and have toured with signed bands as well as recorded for hundreds of artists. I have taught for 20 yrs. and sent many people to music school and prepared them for careers in music as well as given others a fun hobby to enjoy. Lessons are customized to every student's direction and musical tastes. I teach all styles: Rock, Jazz, Folk Classical, Bluegrass a ... View Profile
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GUITAR LESSONS FOR BEGINNERS

GUITAR LESSONS FOR BEGINNERS

With over 10 years of guitar teaching experience, Peter Kuers is available to teach guitar lessons to beginners of all ages. As a motivated educator, Peter's guitar teaching methods and beginner's guitar lessons encourage creative development, positive thinking, and a fun approach to learning and playing the guitar. Peter's music teaching studio features a variety of beginner's guitar education materials, recording and play-a-long capabilities and provides a comfortable, relaxing environment to learn the instrument. Curriculum ------------ Basic theory Reading Chord structures Picking Strumming Finger technique Ear training Time keeping ... View Profile
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Guitar Lessons For Beginners

Guitar Lessons For Beginners

Hi, my name is Chancey Greer, and I'm a guitar instructor in Burlington with teaching experience, both privately and at music schools in Burlington and Charleston.I love teaching the guitar. My favorite moment in teaching is when a student realizes they just learned one of their favorite songs! What better way to fall in love with playing an instrument than learning the music you enjoy? Taylor Swift? 21 Pilots? The Beatles? David Bowie? Heck yeah!My goal is to elevate students to a place of understanding the fundamentals of guitar and music. This enables a student to explore the music they love. Most importantly, I want to give them the tools ... View Profile
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Courses & Guides

Guitar Lessons for Beginners

Guitar Lessons for Beginners

Want to learn how to play the guitar? Go from knowing nothing about the guitar and learn to play songs everbody loves with this free course.
12 lessons 1.5 hours All levels English
Guitar Chords

Guitar Chords

Learn the best guitar chords, how to read guitar chords, and how to play guitar chords. Easy step-by-step lessons for beginners. Want to check out the lessons?
33 lessons 6.5 hours All levels English
Guitar Lessons

How much do guitar lessons cost?

Read more about local pricing and what to expect in our cost guide.

Frequently asked questions

How much do guitar lessons cost?

The average cost for guitar lessons is $40 per hour. Available for all ages and all skill levels of guitar playing, the pricing of individual or group guitar lessons can start as low as $20/hour. Teachers charge based on their location, years of teaching, levels of knowledge and expertise, and travel time (if applicable). Lessons can last from half an hour to a full hour, and are priced accordingly.


How long does it take to learn guitar?

If you just want to learn a few chords to strum along to some songs, then learning to play the guitar really isn't that hard for most people. Many students are able to learn a few chords and get a decent strumming pattern going after a few weeks. If you've had prior experience playing an instrument, you can expect to pick it up after just a few lessons.


Should I take guitar lessons online or in person lessons?

Private in person guitar lessons with a skilled instructor that is focused on you, your interests, and your progress is the most sought after experience and hard to replicate online. Plus, you tend to learn faster in person. On the other hand, online guitar lessons are quickly becoming popular. The selection of teachers is not limited to those in your geographical area and you can communicate via video in real time with your teacher in the comfort of your home. When filling out your request on Lessons.com, we recommend you select both online and local options, then compare your options and see what works best for you.


How old should children be before starting guitar lessons?

A child as young as 4 can begin to learn if they are really motivated and have a patient, creative, and devoted teacher. However, we've found almost all kids under six are too young to benefit from formal guitar lessons, as they require dexterity and levels of concentration children their age can't provide. That being said, lessons do not need to be formal right off the bat, and can just provide a fun introduction. Also, your child may benefit from using a ukulele to start, as it's smaller and easier to learn, but very similar instrument.

Instructor

Burlington Guitar Lessons

(2 reviews)

Burlington Guitar Instruction

Paul Asbell · Burlington, VT


Featured Instructor

Paul Asbell, who has a profile on Lessons.com, began his musical career recording with blues artists Howlin’ Wolf, Muddy Waters, John Lee Hooker, and many others. Paul’s recent recordings as a solo artist explore every facet of American popular music, and he covers songs by artists as varied as Blind Blake, Steely Dan, and Charles Mingus. Paul teaches guitar lessons from his home studio in Burlington, VT, and we were lucky enough to speak with him recently about his guitar teaching. – James Berry, who interviewed Paul Asbell, and is a member of the Lessons.com Team.

Guitarist and Guitar Teacher Paul Asbell

Lessons.com: We’re here today with Paul Asbell. Paul has a long recording career and has been a guitar teacher for quite a while. He has recorded with such musicians as Howlin’ Wolf and Muddy Waters, on a particular favorite album of mine, “Fathers and Sons”. He has done recordings of his own more recently that delve into all corners of Roots Americana music, drawing on sources from many, many sources and eras, and Paul also has a profile on Lessons.com. Welcome, Paul. Thank you for talking with us today.

Paul Asbell: Absolutely. I’m glad to be here. Thank you for asking me.

Lessons.com: It’s really wonderful to be here with you. And, can you tell us first, where you teach? What city and what state are you in?

Paul’s Skype Lessons and Face to Face Guitar Lessons in Burlington, VT

Paul Asbell: I live in Burlington, Vermont – you know, kind of up towards Canadian border, really far north – not that that really matters to a Skypester. And, I teach out of my home studio basically, which is where I am right now. I have probably, at any given time, maybe five Skype students … somewhere between five and ten … and then, maybe, possibly ten to fifteen private students, who I see face to face. My objective with the Skype thing is to try to realize as much of what we can do face to face … try to replicate … here. DSL and broadband has gotten so much better in recent months, and they’re so easy to send pdf’s back and forth, which I do often, when I’m teaching, that it’s pretty darn close now to being, you know, a face to face lesson, except, you know, it’s modulated by the electronics.

Lessons.com: Yeah, the technology has improved dramatically within a very recent period, like you say.

Paul Asbell: Yeah.

Lessons.com: Well, can you tell us a little bit about the … one, the guitar lesson climate there in Burlington? Do you find there are a lot of people who want to learn guitar, and, also, what styles do your guitar students most often want to learn?

The Perfect Guitar Instructor …

Paul Asbell: Well, what I try to be … I mean, in my opinion, the perfect instructor, which I try to be, is somebody who’s really ready, no matter who walks up in front of them and says, “Well, I’d like to be able to do this someday” or “I heard this person on a record that I have or on YouTube, or in concert, or, Paul, I heard you at a concert last night, and that’s what I’d like to do”. And then, of course, the question becomes “Well, where are you now?” Basically, what I’ll try to do with a student is figure out where point A and point B are, as soon as we can. Point A being “What do you know, and what could you do at this moment? And point B being: “What is your pipe dream of what you’d like to think you could achieve down the road … be it six months or twenty years or whatever?”

Lessons.com: And I notice you have several guitars around you right now. You mentioned the various styles of guitar that you teach. Do you use different guitars to demonstrate to guitar students different styles they would like to learn? Maybe you could play a little bit for us.

Learning to Play Guitar on an Acoustic Flattop Guitar Paul Asbell: Well, one thing that I do is play acoustic guitar – flattop acoustic – both fingerstyle and pick style. I’ve been doing it … actually this is the very first kind of guitar that I ever learned to play … You know people like Woody Guthrie and Bob Dylan were actually my sort of heroes, when I was like twelve. And then that was, by far, you know, the most significant thing for a while, and I kind of progressed to people like Mississippi John Hurt (Editor: Paul plays a very cool country blues, fingerstyle piece that you can hear on the Paul Asbell guitar teacher page.) So, various styles of fingerstyle blues is one of the things I’m kind of known for … to the point where a certain number of my students kind of know that that’s something that I really love. And, if that is part of what their point B is, then they often say it right away. They may relate to a certain record or a certain concert or something.

Many Varieties of Fingerstyle Blues Guitar (Editor: Paul plays another example of his fingerstyle blues guitar virtuosity, and listening to it is sure to conjure up images of the deep southern roots of blues guitar). He then goes on to say:

Paul Asbell: And that style, which I … you may recognize as not far from kind of basic Muddy Waters … which we were just talking about “Fathers and Sons” a minute ago. But, you know, it really comes from a guy named Robert Johnson, as you probably know, and there’s kind of diverse subsections of fingerstyle blues, but a certain proportion of people that come for lessons are people who are really in love, as I am, with that style, who want to get somehow either farther with it, or maybe get into from scratch, and they just don’t know kind of how. And, that is definitely one of the things not only do I do teach, but I love to teach. I feel like I’ve figured out certain things that are very, very typical hurdles people can’t get over … or entryways that they just haven’t discovered, so they can’t get in the door.

The Powerful Advantage of Guitar Lessons with a Guitar Teacher Paul Asbell: At this point in our history, there’s a million things on the internet; we are deluged with information, so everybody can find a tab somewhere of Johnson’s … or “Freight Train” by Libba Cotton or something … or “Deep River Blues” by Doc Watson, and nobody is wanting for any of those things – unlike five or six years ago. But on the other hand, “Why can’t I play this thing?” and “What is keeping me from being able to do it?” is something that I really think is a must for a certain number of people, and that’s what I hear over and over again is “I just don’t know where to begin with this stuff”. And that’s what I work at a lot.

Lessons.com: And, we were discussing your more recent CD’s recently that delve into a lot of these American musical traditions from all different eras, and it sounds like the music you’re describing on the acoustic guitar, that is the wheelhouse that you enjoy most. But, do you specialize in teaching that, or do you find that a lot of your guitar students are interested in other things, so you go with them in that direction?

Paul Asbell: Definitely a whole bunch of people that … who are interested in acoustic guitar … they may own one, they may not, but, you know, they’re electric guitarists at heart, as we all know. Probably, there’s far more electric guitarists than acoustic guitarists, and so, for people who are electric players, the style that I associate with … Buddy Guy and Otis Rush – people from Chicago, who I used to play with, but most people would associate with Eric Clapton or Stevie Ray Vaughn.

(Editor: Paul straps on his Fender Stratocaster and plays a blues riff in the key of A like it just rolled out of him. Again, please check out his video profile to hear Paul play these examples.) Paul continues …

Electric Blues and Lead Guitar Lessons Paul Asbell: You know, basically, what I would call blues, electric lead guitar, and all of the rock forms that kind of have sprung historically from that. A certain number of people who come for guitar lessons, that’s really what gets them … that’s what they like, and maybe they have a notion that someday they would like to pick up an acoustic guitar and maybe use the fingers of their right hand and fingerstyle, but that’s sort of off the radar screen of the immediate thing. And so, for me, if I can get right to the heart of what somebody is fired up about right now … I think any guitar teacher would be an idiot to not pay attention to what is it that this person’s heart is beating for right now. You sort of have to!

Lessons.com: It’s the core of it all.

Paul Asbell: It is, and so, a lot of times … sometimes, if somebody really doesn’t know what they want to do, I will kind of grab a couple of guitars, as I am doing here and play a little bit and just watch – see if their eyes light up. I know that sounds kind of silly … I tend to think that somebody will know exactly what they want to do, but that isn’t often the case. I think sometimes either somebody’s afraid to say it or else they just haven’t quite figured out what the name of that thing is; when they hear it, they’ll know it.

Paul Talks About Learning to Play Jazz Guitar And so, sometimes it’s really worthwhile for me to go through with different guitars, playing slightly different styles … excuse me for a second – I’ll grab another guitar (Paul reaches for his archtop) and play one or two things and just watch their eyes and see if there’s that thing … and so, for example, here’s – it’s not exactly conventional, but it’s a more or less jazz instrument.

(Editor: Paul plays a bit of a rhythm / lead arrangement of “The Sunny Side of The Street”)

The Art of Learning and Playing Chord / Melody Guitar (Editor: He goes on to say … )

And that’s a whole world … basically it’s a lifetime actually, to be honest with you, and you perhaps know that. The world of jazz guitar, be it playing single strings … (Paul plays some more.) being, whether it’s playing kind of bebop leads and stuff or kind of playing fusionesque – kind of things of that style … or in some ways, what is the most difficult of all, kind of playing … I would just call it chord / melody guitar, where the guitar is being a piano, which is what I was attempting to do just a second ago. That’s one of those things that I think comes after a whole bunch of other styles have been worked at, and possibly a person’s gotten somewhere with it. But if they really want to figure out a way so that they can actually play something that doesn’t require another player, you know, can be put to use.

Someone can say “Do you know this song?” and they can sit down and play that song, without having to have a jam track behind them or, you know, that sort of thing. I think one of the things for guitarists that’s befuddling is they’ll hear some awesome Eric Clapton lead or whatever, and they sort of never have thought that “If I play that lead, but there’s nobody playing with me, it’s gonna sound … I mean if Eric Clapton himself was here playing that lead, it would sound very, very empty.” So, how do you get it so you can play a blues, you know … (Paul demonstrates another example on guitar.)

So, they can play something where it actually feels like that’s that song, and I’m not really missing anybody.

Lessons.com: That’s right … a very full sound.

Paul Asbell: Yeah. That’s kind of every jazz guitarist’s vision of what they’d like to be, and I think if you do it decently – people don’t realize how hard it is – but I think often people don’t also realize … they don’t know the words to ask for that – if you get what I mean. So, I kind of try to play certain things to be able to say “Is this sounding like something you’d like to do? And at some point, you find something that fires a person up enough, and off we go.

Lessons.com: And, you mentioned a bit of yourself as a guitar student. Can you tell us a little bit about your background and how you learned guitar?

Paul’s Guitar Lesson Experiences Paul Asbell: Well, it’s funny, because I’m pretty much entirely self-taught. I took two lessons ever – one with a hero of mine, named Wayne Bennett, who lived in Chicago, on South Side, very, very close to where I used to live in the late sixties. And, he used to play with Bobby Bland. I realized that Bobby Bland’s guitarist, a guy I’d been listening to on all these great cuts and, you know, just loved his solo on “Stormy Monday” and all of these tunes I could think … “I Want No Woman” … a whole bunch of things where I could sing you those solos, like a kid could sing you Jimmy Page’s “Stairway To Heaven” solo. And I found that this guy lived three blocks away. So, of course, I went to him for a lesson. I was a little bummed that he … once he discovered that I played blues, and I said “I want to learn more”, and he said “You already know how to play blues. Here’s what I’m gonna show you” and proceeded to show me “Up Up and Away in My Beautiful Balloon”. It sort of took me by surprise. And so, to be perfectly honest, I never went back for a lesson then with Wayne, which I was kind of chagrined at, but I was not ready … Now I understand what he was trying to do, but, at the time, it was a bridge too far for me.

And the second lesson, and only lesson, I ever took, besides with Wayne, was with a guy named Barry Galbraith, who’s a very, very esteemed jazz guitarist. And, basically, Barry said, “You sound like you’re on the right path, and, if I were in your shoes, I would just keep going. You can come back for a lesson, if you want. But I’ll just tell you, whatever you’ve been doing so far. And in a way, I went to find out what he would say, and I respected the hell out of him for saying that. I was very grateful to him, cause that’s kinda what I wanted to hear. “I mean if I’m off-base with something I’m missing, please let me know”, and he basically said, “Keep doing what you’re doing.”

Lessons.com: That’s wonderful, Paul, and on your website you mentioned that, growing up there were musicians playing in Chicago, who would visit your folks’ house, such as Big Bill Broonzy. Did you learn from various musicians who would visit your family’s house about the guitar?

The Influence of Growing Up in Chicago on His Guitar Playing Paul Asbell: It would be a great story if I could say I sat on Big Bill Broonzy’s knee and him showing me, but I wish. I was three, and I just barely remember it. He was one of my faves and certainly one of my musical heroes now. So, it’s a funny thing for me that I didn’t really remember that this guy was over at the house. I kind of rediscovered him and realized that this was the guy that my parents knew back in Chicago, but now I’m a serious guitarist, or guitar student, and I’m a completely different person in a way than that little kid, that was bummed because he was trying to get to sleep at night, and my dad was playing music with his friends, and there was music in the house all the time. I have to say, at some point, the gratitude … that I saw very clearly that music was something that humans produce … As opposed to from the radio. That’s a big thing that I’ll forever be grateful for. I wish that I could give that gift to somebody, but it is really just how you grow up, and I was fortunate to grow up in that way.

Lessons.com: And it sounds like that is what you offer your guitar students in the space of the guitar lesson is that chance to be there with the live music.

The Evolving Guitar Lesson Perspective: Information vs Interaction Paul Asbell: Yeah. Yeah. It’s funny … because, when I first started teaching, I never really thought that way. I really kind of thought “no, no, no … the best thing I really can do, no matter what somebody expects the guitar lesson to be … the best thing I can do is really just give the information that they need, so that they can do it themselves. And, I don’t think that that’s wrong, but I had that idea when information was very, very hard to come by – thirty-five years ago – you know, when there was not an internet, and there weren’t any where near as many books and tabs and whatnot out there. So, information was hard to come by, and I thought I was doing, you know, a service by throwing out this transcription to somebody or providing information … you know, kind of music theory or whatever.

And now we live in a kind of information glutted age, where, if my theory had been right, there’d be no point for a guitar teacher at all, because it’s all out there, and a lot of it’s free. And yet, there’s a lot of people who want guitar lessons, and I think part of it is because it ain’t just about the information anymore … maybe it never was. A lot of it is “I need to see somebody doing it”. And even the non-verbal little cues that you get from watching somebody becomes a part of how this music is transmitted … If you know what I mean … And, having a personal relationship with that person and having that person actually pay attention to what you’re about, as opposed to showing you what they’re about. I now really think that that’s a big, big part of what the lesson thing can be, and I try to remember that all the time when I’m teaching.

Lessons.com: Yeah, what you said about music being something human beings do … the gratitude … I think it does come down to that at the bottom line.

Paul Asbell: Yeah.

Lessons.com: Well, we’re going to end the interview in a minute, but it would be great to hear you play a little more guitar on the guitar of your choice … whichever one you’d like to do, but maybe a little more of a song than what you were playing before and then we’ll end the interview at that point.

Paul Asbell: Yeah. Well, let’s see. Here’s a little unpremeditated tune that …

(Editor: Paul takes us out of the interview with a short, but soulful rendition of “Key To The Highway”.)

Lessons.com: That’s beautiful, Paul. Thank you so much for playing that and … Paul Asbell, I want to thank you again for taking the time to talk to us. It’s been a real pleasure learning more about you and your music, and about your guitar teaching.

Paul Asbell: So appreciate it, James. Good talking to you.

Lessons.com: It’s good talking to you too and look forward to seeing you soon on Find a Guitar Teacher.

Paul Asbell: Sounds great!
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